How to Make Your Own Reflector for Outdoor Photography

A reflector is perhaps the simplest tool you can use to elevate the quality of photos or videos that you make. Cameras these days are so good that you don’t need high-end equipment to make proper content. It’s the lighting that really matters. For natural light shooters, light is freely available and is not a big deal. However, by using reflectors, you get to shape light the way you want it, fill in harsh shadows, and make your subject stand out that much more. And luckily, you don’t need to spend a ton of money in order to have all this. In fact, in this video, photographer Markus Rothkranz shows you how you can make your own reflector for outdoor videos and photography:

The only materials Rothkranz uses to make a DIY reflector is a light stand, some foam core, and some tin foil. If you’re sure that you’ll always be working with an assistant, just the tin foil glued to some foam core will do. Your assistant can then hold the foam core to reflect the light on the subject and fill in the shadows.

But the setup that Rothkranz uses is a bit more versatile. He’s glued a Baby Pin Wall Plate on the foam core that he uses to attach a grip head. This grip head is what allows you to attach the entire setup on the light stand. Once fixed on the light stand, you can maneuver the reflector any way you like, that way you don’t need an assistant with you to use the reflector.

“If you don’t have somebody to hold the reflector for you, this is a great way to do it.”

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One response to “How to Make Your Own Reflector for Outdoor Photography”

  1. fisk says:

    carrying a squaremetre of non-collapsible foam bord through the middle of nowhere … seriously ?
    I do prefer the trusty 5-in-1’s and a simple telescopic reflector holder instead. Same indoors.

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