Catching Up With the Silver & Light Project: A Wet Plate Collodion Camera Truck

When we were first introduced to Ian Ruhter back in 2012, he was embarking on a nationwide photography tour in with his uniquely large camera. That is, a huge delivery truck that he converted into a wet plate collodion camera and mobile lab. Now, two years later, Ruhter is still at it with even bigger ambitions and goals than before. Take a look at all he’s been up to and hear about all that’s in store for him in this 25-minute long interview:

After a disappointing and spirit-crushing experience on his last attempt to photograph Yosemite, Ruhter returned to the national park to seek redemption. With the memories of his first try weighing on his mind, the second go around proved to be an emotional experience for Ruhter and his crew. Fortunately, the outcome was beautiful photographs and an uplifting experience:

Since teaming up with the Fahey Klein Gallery in California, Ruhter is taking his work to the next level and making big plans for the future, which include trips to the east coast, Detroit, and the hopes of photographing the President of the United States.

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Silver Collodion Print of Yosemite National Park by Ian Ruhter

“My greatest failure in life came when I lost the ability to believe in my own dreams. It had taken a year and a half to return to Yosemite after enduring one of my most heartbreaking experiences. In an unexpected twist of fate I regained the courage to try again after seeing the world through a child’s eyes. Since the release of the Silver & Light film we have accomplished more than we ever thought possible.”

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