Self Portrait Advanced Tutorial

When we think of self-portraits, they don’t necessarily need to be those mediocre snapshots that we take with our phones. If planned and executed thoughtfully, you can’t easily differentiate a self-portrait from a portrait taken by another photographer. So, if you’re a little short on manpower and want to take some sick-looking self-portraits, we have photographer Aidin Robbins for you today. He shares some great tips and techniques to help you take great self-portraits in this advanced selfie photography tutorial:

As Robbins explains in the video, an intervalometer will help you a lot in taking some great-looking self-portraits. Using an intervalometer, you can program your camera to continuously take photos at certain intervals. This way, you don’t need to move back and forth. Instead, you can just concentrate on being more creative. Some cameras come with a feature that mimics the intervalometer. So, be sure to go through your camera manual.

And as for the composition, go for environmental portraits. You can emphasize not just yourself (the subject), but also the surrounding elements. You’ll need to shoot a bit wider for this. And this will also give you greater flexibility in terms of focus and framing. Composing with the environmental elements will also allow you to distribute emphasis between you and your surroundings and reduce the pressure on yourself. You can even use the environmental elements to your advantage by interacting with them.

Robbins also shares an interesting tip at the end of the video that’ll allow you to capture motion in your surroundings while you’re perfectly frozen. So, be sure to watch the complete video and take some awesome self-portraits.

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