How To Create Depth in Landscape Photography

Taking great landscape photography isn’t just about finding a beautiful space and snapping your camera’s shutter. It’s more so about understanding the elements that help a beautiful space translate into a beautiful photograph. One of the most important factors in creating a captivating photo of a sprawling space? Depth.

As photographer Nick Page browses through his favorite images, he notes that the ones that have a sense of depth are the ones that consistently draw in his attention. But how, exactly, does a photographer manage to capture depth? How can you make something that’s two-dimensional look anything other than shallow? Actually, there are several techniques that you can easily adopt to add a little oomph to your images.

Page offers tips to add depth when you’re creating a composition as well as when you’re busy in post-processing. Sometimes, adding depth is as simple as considering your camera’s placement and the frame composition. Other times, some strategic edits in just the right spot can really impact the way one perceives an image. Tune in for awesome examples from Nick’s portfolio detailing his strategies for drawing viewers deeper into his work!

For further training: The Complete Landscape Photography Guide

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One response to “How To Create Depth in Landscape Photography”

  1. Stan Hooper says:

    Just a note regarding spelling. Demension is listed near the end and it is either a misspelling or, less likely, references dementia, a psychological condition. Dimension would be the accurate spelling. Beyond that, your photographs were exceptional representations of all of the characteristics showing depth. Thanks for that and your voiced narrative, all of which made for an excellent presentation.

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