7 Tips for Photographing the Magic of Autumn

Early autumn is among the most photogenic times of the year. It’s wonderful to stand outside and capture the unique greens, yellows and red that transform the trees. Mornings are crisp, it’s not too cold and the days aren’t that short yet. And since autumn is upon us, today we have photographer Nigel Danson who shares seven brilliant tips to help you take some fantastic autumn images:

There’s so much happening during autumn that you can get overwhelmed when photographing landscapes. The world often looks so amazing in person, yet the photos you take may not be able to justify this natural beauty.

Colors are the most noticeable visual change that occurs during autumn. It’s not only the trees, but also the grasses, the shrubs and the bracken that transform into beautiful yellows, reds and oranges. By including a blue or grey sky, you can also compose with complementary colors. The added contrast in colors makes the image even more interesting to look at. And of course, you should feel free to experiment with the HSL slider in post. You can add some punch to your images that way.

Another important point that Danson discusses is how rapidly things can change during autumn. You won’t believe how quickly the look and colors of the landscapes and vegetation can change in a matter of days. The same thing applies to the weather condition and the availability of light. With the incoming winter, you’d want to make the best use of whatever’s available right away.

“It’s amazing how much difference two or three days can make to those leaf and bracken colors.”

If you’re planning to head out for some autumn photography, make sure that you watch the complete video. Danson’s insights will really help you elevate your autumn photos to the next level.

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