Articles by Andy Lim Archives - Page 2 of 2 - PictureCorrect14 articles

Chasing the Elusive Perfect Exposure in Photography

Chasing the Elusive Perfect Exposure in Photography

If you’re taking a portrait of a couple against a backlit background, the likely subject would be the faces of the couple. So focus your efforts on getting the exposure of the faces correct, and ignore the background. In this scenario, you obviously cannot blindly follow your camera’s exposure meter, which would cause your couple’s faces to be underexposed (the severity of the underexposure depends on the light ratio between background and subject). So you would need to add in some exposure compensation, which would not only brighten up the faces of the couple, but also brighten up the background, causing some or all the background objects to disappear.

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Professional Photography Lighting on a Budget

Professional Photography Lighting on a Budget

Not everyone can afford—or needs—the most expensive kit when it comes to lighting. As a matter of fact, small and portable lighting kits make a photographer’s work more efficient. Here’s a selection of tools to help you assemble your lighting kit even with the smallest of budgets. Speedlights Speedlights are portable alternatives to heavy and […]

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Exposure Compensation and Metering Modes in Photography

Exposure Compensation and Metering Modes in Photography

Exposure compensation is what you can do to override the exposure settings set by the camera’s metering system. Assuming you have set the ISO to a specific level, eg. ISO 100, the metering system in your camera measures the amount of light in the photo and tells you the aperture and shutter speed needed for a correct exposure. There are usually 3 types of metering methods used in today’s DSLR cameras. Most cameras use multi-segment metering as the default metering system. This metering system measures the brightness in several areas in the photo and finds an average (emphasis varies depending on the camera).

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Raw Files in Photography

Raw Files in Photography

The RAW format is a digital photographer’s friend. If you shoot for commercial purposes (eg. to sell your images to a stock image library) shooting in RAW allows you to squeeze every single drop of quality from your shots. For a JPEG image, the image is first captured by the sensor, then the camera processes the image by applying a contrast curve to it, sharpens it (unless you turned off sharpening), converts it into 8-bits and then stores it in the memory card by compressing it. When this compression is performed, a little bit of image quality is thrown away, in order to achieve a smaller file size.

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