Shield Your Camera From Rain and Snow with This Inexpensive Hack

Cameras are built to be durable enough to withstand weather, drops, shocks, and plenty of other accidents and anomalies. Nevertheless, most photographers want to prolong the life of their equipment as much as possible. Luckily, protecting your camera doesn’t need to be an expense that breaks your bank account:

As Benjamin Jaworskyj explains, you can effectively keep your gear from making contact with any harmful elements by using a trick that costs virtually nothing.

Supplies

Here’s what you need to replicate this hack:

  • A lens hood
  • Rubber band(s)
  • One plastic bag

Plastic bag covering camera

DIY Camera Protection Instructions

  1. Secure your camera to a tripod. Screw the lens hood onto your lens.
  2. Cover the entire camera with an ordinary plastic shopping bag. This will serve as a barrier between your gear and any precipitation.
  3. Once the bag is in place, use the rubber bands along the length of the lens to secure the bag in place. Use multiple rubber bands for decreased movement and shifting.
  4. Use your fingernails to make a tear in the plastic so that the glass of the lens can poke out. Fold the plastic back over the lens hood so that your view isn’t obstructed.
  5. Optional: If you’d like, you can make a small hole in the plastic that corresponds with the camera’s viewfinder. Remove the viewfinder clip (as shown in the video tutorial) and use it to further secure your bag into place.

Voila! This handy precaution takes almost no time or effort and will ensure that your camera is safe from water damage. Sudden rain, snow, or sleet no longer has to be feared. These supplies are easy to store in a camera bag and prepare at a moment’s notice.

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