Photojournalist Discusses Conflict Photography

So much in the realm of photography emphasizes art and beauty. But not all photographers seek to romanticize reality. Photojournalists are often asked to create images that accurately portray an ugliness that cannot be disguised. These brave photographers risk their lives and witness unbearable events in order to share the realities of war, famine, and disaster with the masses.

One such Reuters photographer, Goran Tomasevic, has been photographing conflict for 20 years. His photographic career has sent him to the front lines of conflict in many countries, including Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya, Egypt, and, most recently, Syria. Watch this interview to learn about what it’s like to be a photographer in a war zone:

Aside from taking graphic and disturbing pictures of violence with his Canon 1D X and Canon 5D Mark III, Tomasevic works to keep himself and his colleagues safe from harm. But he always tries to remain at the front lines. He is committed to his work and stays at a scene of conflict to the end. He must depict the reality of the situation. He wants viewers to see exactly what it was like.

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While many would wonder why a photographer would go to such lengths for a picture or question the role of a photojournalist, Tomasevic believes that his documentation of the brutality of war and conflict drives people to help. In photographing these horrific scenes, he hopes that his work will cause fewer people to be harmed in the future.

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One Comment

  1. R Sail says:

    Can not image how difficult war photography must be… Glad I do weddings

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