Crop Camera vs. Cropping Full-Frame

Most of us assume that a full frame camera will always give us better results on just about everything, with the only reason to not use one being the price. But is this really true? Do they always out-perform DX or APS-C cameras (crop camera)? Take a look at this video and see what you think.

Now of course, this is a comparison test about cropping an image taken by a full frame camera to the same field of view that you would have in a cropped camera. It really only matters for when you’re cropping down a full frame image. In a cropped image, the crop camera has a greater pixel density in the area we’re cropping to with a full frame. This is when a DX or APS-C camera would be the way to go.

The greater pixel density of crop cameras

On the other hand, if you’re intending to use most or all of the image you’re taking with the full frame, a crop camera will be nowhere hear the quality. It all comes down to pixel density.

When to use dx cameras for wildlife photography

Steve Perry‘s verdict? Use a full frame camera until it’s clear that you’ll be cropping quite a bit of the image. Of course, many of us can only afford one or the other. If that’s true for you, it’ll come down to what you’re using the camera for and your budget. For example, if you’re a landscape photographer using a wide angle lens, a full frame would be the way to go. But if you’re needing a longer throw—something that’s likely to need a telephoto lens—it’s better to go with the crop sensor body.

In the end, you’ll need to assess what size frame you usually shoot, and then balance performance and the amount of detail captured with what you can afford.

Like This Article?

Don't Miss The Next One!

Join over 100,000 photographers of all experience levels who receive our free photography tips and articles to stay current:

Leave a Comment

Personalize your comment with an avatar from Gravatar.com!

Prove Your Humanity * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.

New! Want more photography tips? We now offer a free newsletter for photographers:

No, my photos are the best, close this forever